A Simplified Understanding of the Universe that
Presens New Paradigms for Space, Matter,
Time, Gravity, Light, and Consciousness.
 
A VARIETY OF STRINGS

Strings on a two-dimensional plane may take different shapes, such as a straight line, an arc, or a spiraling curve. With three physical dimensions and time, the strings may be rotated on an axis. We now have the foundation for elementary particles with a variety of mass, charge, color, spin, handedness, and symmetry, each particle being POEM.

The succession of time cells provides for a change in the position of the string with each new cell. As an example, if the string formed a semi-circle in two dimensions, it could rotate on an axis through the ends of the arc by jumping position slightly in each successive time cell interval. This would result in space-time as an illusion of a sphere occupying space—or an illusion of mass. This may also be visualized as the string being stretched similarly to M-time 3 in Figure A, but instead of being stretched into a plane, it is stretched as a membrane around the axis of rotation, encapsulating a portion of space.

Depending on the size of the isolated portion of enclosed space, the illusion of the volume of occupied space would vary—or mass would increase or decrease. With the possibility of polarity manifesting, the string ends could have different charges (positive or negative) or, in the case of unexposed ends, no charge.

Table A and Figures1-28 (displayed more clearly at the end of this section) show twenty-eight versions of how a string revolving about an axis can present a variety of characteristics. Figures 1-4 each depict a string whose ends revolve in a circle in space, each end reducing the strength of its charge by spreading it about an area in space. The strings in Figures 5-8 have their ends on the rotational axis, concentrating their charges, giving each end a strong charge. Figures 9-16 and 17-20 have, respectively, one or both ends encapsulated by the enclosed space, which nullifies the charge of the encapsulated end(s). Figures 21-24 show strings with one end on the axis and the other revolving in a circle nearby, canceling some of the concentrated charge, resulting in a fractional charge.



Table A
 

Polarized
Weak
charges

Polarized
Strong
charges
+ or –
Weak
charge
+ or –
Strong
charge
No Charge + or –
Fractional
charge
Neutral Charge
Large Mass
Figure 1

Figure 5

Figure 9

Figure 13

Figure 17

Figure 21

Figure 25
Medium Mass
Figure 2

Figure 6

Figure 10

Figure 14

Figure 18

Figure 22

Figure 26
Low Mass
Figure 3

Figure 7

Figure 11

Figure 15

Figure 19

Figure 23

Figure 27
No Mass
Figure 4

Figure 8

Figure 12

Figure 16

Figure 20

Figure 24

Figure 28

The volume encapsulated by a revolving string dictates the mass of the particle. When no volume is contained, as shown in Figures 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28, the particle has no mass. In Figures 25-28 both ends revolve in the same circle, resulting in a neutral charge. Variations of the strings shown in Table A would result in a vast variety of masses and charges for different particles. Additional possible configurations are shown in Figures 29-36, some depicting weaker fractional charges than those shown in Table A. In each of Figures 1-36, the image on the left shows the string as it exists on a plane in one time cell and the axis about which the string will revolve. The image on the right shows the string in space-time. The images do not show which end of the string is positive and which is negative, nor do they define the direction of rotation—clockwise or counterclockwise. So, as an example, Figure 14 may have either a positive or negative strong charge, and may be rotating either clockwise or counter-clockwise, giving Figure 14 four possible different characteristics. Also, the Low Mass figures can be made to show much less mass and the Medium Mass figures can be made to show any mass between the Low Mass figures and the Large Mass figures. Therefore, while Table A shows only twenty-eight variations, the number of possibilities for the physical characteristics, or properties, of a string is quite vast.


Figure 1
 

Figure 2
 

Figure 3
 

Figure 4
 

Figure 5
 

Figure 6

Figure 7

Figure 8

Figure 9
 

Figure 10
 

Figure 11
 

Figure 12
 

Figure 13
 

Figure 14
 

Figure 15
 

Figure 16
 

Figure 17
 

Figure 18
 

Figure 19
 

Figure 20
 

Figure 21
 

Figure 22
 

Figure 23
 

Figure 24
 

Figure 25
 

Figure 26
 

Figure 27
 

Figure 28
 

Figure 29
 

Figure 30
 

Figure 31
 

Figure 32
 

Figure 33
 

Figure 34
 

Figure 35
 

Figure 36